"
  • Old friends are best. John Selden
"

Visit Narrow Gauge Railway Museum, Tywyn

COMPLETED BY 0

LISTED 0

Located at the Tywyn Wharf terminus of the Talyllyn Railway, the Narrow Gauge Railway Museum is an important collection of artefacts relating to Narrow Gauge Railways in the British Isles, throughout a period spanning some 200 years. The collection ranges from complete locomotives to smaller pieces such as paperwork, signalling equipment and tickets. As such, it is a unique and comprehensive record of these fascinating railways, nearly 80 of which are represented in the collection.

The Museum displays contain a special section devoted to the Reverend W. V. Awdry, creator of "Thomas the Tank Engine". Awdry was an early volunteer on the Talyllyn Railway, and its history and his experiences were the inspiration for his "Skarloey Railway" on which operated scarcely disguised counterparts of Talyllyn locomotives. The collection includes a reconstruction of part of the Reverend Awdrey's study from his last home in Stroud, Gloustershire. See The Awdry Connection and the Museum web site and for further information on the Awdry and Thomas connection.

Visitor Information

The museum is housed in a purpose built part of the new Tywyn Wharf Station, which was opened by Their Royal Highnesses the Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall in 2005. The museum occupies 2 floors, connected by stairs and a lift. From the first floor, a balcony gives a view over the Wharf station yard and the Cambrian Coast line which runs past the site.

The Museum displays contain a special section devoted to the Reverend W. V. Awdry, creator of "Thomas the Tank Engine". Awdry was an early volunteer on the Talyllyn Railway, and its history and his experiences were the inspiration for his "Skarloey Railway" on which operated scarcely disguised counterparts of Talyllyn locomotives. The collection includes a reconstruction of part of the Reverend Awdry's study from his last home in Stroud, Gloucestershire. See the Museum web site for further information on the Awdry and Thomas connection.

Admission to the museum is free; donation boxes are provided for those who wish to show their appreciation. All monies collected are put towards the development and conservation of our collection.