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Travel to Perth, Scotland

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Perth is a historic city set beside the beautiful River Tay and located just 90 miles from 90% of Scotland’s population. It’s the perfect place to stay whether you are exploring the city itself or the huge range of attractions and activities available across Perthshire. Check out the accommodation section which provides details a wide range of options to suit every taste and budget.

Perth has a fantastic selection of independent businesses offering a wide range of unique, quirky and high quality products you won’t find anywhere else so why not combine a visit to Scone Palace or The Black Watch Castle and Museum with a spot of shopping.

Perth was well established by the 12th century, a burgh (town) in 1106 and a royal burgh in 1210. Until about 1452 it served as the capital of Scotland and was therefore both a frequent royal residence and a centre of government. During the Scottish Wars of Independence, Perth was taken by Edward I of England, who strengthened its fortifications in 1298. It was retaken by Robert I (the Bruce) in 1313 during the fourth of the town’s seven sieges. The English held it again from 1335 to 1339. Perth was a Jacobite city during the Scottish uprisings of 1715 and 1745, and the insurgent James Edward, the Old Pretender, was proclaimed king at its market cross.

Few buildings remain from this eventful past, apart from the Church of St. John the Baptist, which was built about 1440 and replaced an earlier church on the site. There in 1559 John Knox preached an inflammatory sermon denouncing idolatry, as a result of which four monasteries in Perth were destroyed by mobs. The Salutation Hotel, built in 1699, is said to be the oldest hotel building in Scotland. The city’s notable modern public buildings include St. Ninian’s Episcopal Cathedral (1850–90) and Perth prison, erected in 1812 to house French prisoners of the Napoleonic Wars.

During the Middle Ages Perth was a significant river port at the head of the Tay estuary, but it gradually declined. Fertilizers are still imported in quantity, and seed potatoes are exported. Perth has long been a centre for whisky blending and distilling, food processing, and the manufacture of glass. Although the city has always maintained a wide range of industries, it is more important as the commercial centre for its agricultural hinterland. Its livestock sales are famous in Great Britain. During the late 20th century a variety of corporations established offices in Perth, and it became a centre for business and financial services. Perth houses Perth College, a member of the University of the Highlands and Islands Perth. Perth is the historic county town (seat) of Perthshire and the administrative centre of Perth and Kinross. Pop. (2004 est.) 43,590.