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Travel to Lisbon, Portugal

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Are you looking for a different place to visit? Why not try Lisbon in Portugal? To start off your Portuguese adventure, try looking for a great experience at the heart of the country. The city is special and it belongs to the list of global alpha cities. With 2.8 million people inhabiting the metropolitan area of Lisbon and its economic importance, the city is one of the most significant areas in the Iberian Peninsula. Lisbon is also the seat of government and has a GDP higher than the European average.

Lisbon is also the westernmost capital of the European mainland and is close to the Atlantic Ocean. The Monsanto Forest Park occupying 10 km is located in the city. The park is one of the biggest there is in Europe.

For people who are interested in culture and arts, the city is teeming with historical structures designed in Modern, Post-modern, Baroque, Romanesque and other architectural styles that will surely satisfy the intellectual curiosity of visitors.

If you would like a taste of the modern life, the Bairro Alto is the heart of the city’s nightlife. It is colorful, entertaining and will surely cater to the needs of its visitors whether it is for shopping or other entertainment activities.

For a one of the kind vacation that offers adventure in everything to arts and tradition, culture, and romance, visit the city of Libson.

Attractions in Lisbon

Castelo de São Jorge: An Iconic Landmark

The most recognized of Lisbon's major attractions, St. George's Castle commands a glorious position near Alfama on the crown of a hill overlooking the Portuguese capital. This is one of Lisbon's most popular tourist destinations. Its impressive battlements, engaging museum, and fascinating archaeological site combine to make the castle a rewarding experience for the whole family, and kids especially will love clambering over the sturdy walls and towers that encircle the grounds.

Mosteiro dos Jerónimos: Built in Honor of Portugal's Age of Discovery

A highlight of any Lisbon sightseeing tour, the 16th-century Jerónimos monastery is one of the great landmarks of Portugal, a stunning monument of immense historic and cultural significance deserving of its UNESCO World Heritage Site accolade. Near the riverfront in Lisbon's attractive Belém neighborhood, the monastery, also known as the Hieronymite convent, was commissioned by King Manuel I in 1501. Built to honor Vasco da Gama's epic 1498 voyage to India, Jerónimos is as much a symbol of the wealth of the Age of Discovery as it is a house of worship (construction was mostly funded by trade in the spices brought back by da Gama). Star features include the fantastically elaborate south portal and the beautiful and serene Manueline cloister. Vasco da Gama's tomb lies just inside the entrance to Santa Maria church.

Oceanário de Lisboa: A Modern Aquarium

The Lisbon Oceanarium is one of Europe's finest aquariums, and one of the largest in the world. It's also arguably the most family-orientated of all the city's visitor attractions. Designed by Peter Chermayeff and built for the Expo 98 World Exposition in an area now known as Parque das Nações, the oceanarium is home to a mind-boggling array of fish and marine animals, including dozens of different species of birds. The ingenious layout represents four separate sea- and landscapes, effectively the habitats of the Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, and Antarctic oceans. These surround an enormous central tank teeming with fish of all shapes and sizes including graceful rays, bulbous sunfish and sleek sharks - kids' favorite denizen of the deep. The wraparound plexiglass allows a fantastic close-up view of this magical undersea world, but you should also seek out less obvious, but no less extraordinary species housed in smaller aquaria such as the exquisitely delicate sea dragon and the comic clownfish.

Museu Calouste Gulbenkian: A Priceless Collection of Western and Eastern Art

A sparkling gem in Lisbon's cultural crown, the Museu Calouste Gulbenkian is also one of the most celebrated museums in Europe. The facility, sited in a lush, verdant park in the north of the city, is named after Calouste Sarkis Gulbenkian, an Armenian oil magnate born in 1869 who bequeathed his vast private art collection to Portugal shortly before his death in 1955. Following the terms of this endowment a foundation was created, the centerpiece of which is this purpose-built arts complex.

Gulbenkian's astonishing hoard features priceless artworks from around the world, which span 4000 years, from ancient Egyptian times to the late 20th century. With so many pieces from so many different periods in history to absorb, you can easily spend half a day browsing the exhibition galleries, but your patience will be rewarded with a mesmerizing journey through one of the finest collections of art on the continent.

Sé: Lisbon's Imposing Cathedral

In the city's Castelo district near the ancient Alfama neighborhood, Lisbon's fortified Romanesque cathedral - the Sé - has undergone several design makeovers since the original structure was consecrated in 1150. A series of earthquakes culminating in the devastating 1755 tremor completely destroyed that which stood in the 12th century. What you see today is a blend of architectural styles, the standout features being the twin castellated bell towers that embellish the downtown skyline - particularly evocative late afternoon when a setting sun burnishes the brickwork with a golden veneer.

 

Success stories

Ciara McAdam O'Connell

Mar 16 at 23:00 pm
Twice

Siru Wallin

Nov 03 at 13:07 pm
That was my most recent visit with my family

Soraia Henriques

Apr 24 at 04:01 am
Just got on the subway and went for it! Lovely day!

Ana Bessa

Jan 29 at 19:07 pm
great city :)

Inês Marques

Jan 06 at 20:28 pm
sou lisboeta

Imke Lüdecke

Jan 03 at 20:15 pm
Pastel de nata ❤

Bambi Traoré

Dec 31 at 03:14 am
Avec mes Less

Danielle Carmody

Nov 27 at 11:41 am
Visited Lisbon 2015