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  • In any moment of decision, the best thing you can do is the right thing, the next best thing is the wrong thing, and the worst thing you can do is nothing. Theodore Roosevelt
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Perform a Magic Trick

COMPLETED BY 40

LISTED 44

(Re)discover the joy of learning.

Want to learn how to read someone's mind? Read a book on magic and you'll discover the secrets behind reading minds and making any number of magical things happen. But, as you read the secrets, you might also get hooked on the psychology of magic, become captivated by the intricacies of stagecraft, enticed by business opportunities, find yourself hanging onto the edge of your seat as you read tales of rivalry and espionage, and more. Even if you're not keen on reading, give a magic book a try. Chances are you won't be able to put it down!

Develop fine and gross motor skills.

Although it is a misconception that a magician's hands move "quicker than the eye," it is true that performing magic requires coordination and control. Project Magic, a non-profit organization founded by internationally known illusionist David Copperfield, exemplifies how magic can be used to help improve dexterity, coordination, ranges of motion, balance and more. If you'd like to learn how to become involved in Project Magic or would like more information, you can call 1-785-270-4610.

Build self-discipline.

Practice and you'll see your skills progress. When you've mastered the mechanics of the trick, you can start scripting it. Stage it. Practice some more. Pick out a costume. Rehearse the trick by putting all of the elements together. When you're ready to perform, the ultimate reward will be your audience's astonishment and applause. Cultivate this disciplined approach to learning and there will be no limit to what you can achieve.

Boost self-confidence

When performed successfully, a magic trick can generate a lot of positive attention and make you feel quite good. Be both humble and proud of what you are able to do. Continue to develop your special skill and see how you can use your talent to help bring joy to others.

Improve interpersonal skills

The process of learning magic is particularly suited to developing social-emotional skills. For example, someone learning magic may end up practicing verbal and nonverbal communication, presentation skills, developing a sensitivity to group dynamics or all of the above. In a recent study conducted by psychologist Richard Wiseman, students who were taught magic were significantly more social and confident than a control group of students who were taught a standard social and health education class. Notably, these interpersonal skills have real-world value and can be an asset when applied both inside and outside the classroom.

Success stories

Evaleez Voo

Dec 25 at 18:01 pm
Magic

Sharon Hudson

Dec 18 at 16:05 pm
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