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  • In any moment of decision, the best thing you can do is the right thing, the next best thing is the wrong thing, and the worst thing you can do is nothing. Theodore Roosevelt
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Become a Florist

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If you want to combine your love of flowers, art, and people, becoming a florist may be a great option for you. As a floral designer, you will create arrangements for many different events and interact with all types of people. There are many paths to becoming a florist. No matter what path you choose, the more hands-on experience you get, the better you will be.

All you need to become an entry-level floral designer is creativity, a high school diploma and on-the-job training. Although a postsecondary education is not required, completing formal design training may increase your marketability to employers and provide you with the knowledge needed to manage or own a retail shop. Common educational opportunities include certificate and associate degree programs in floral design.

Floral designers typically do the following:

  • Grow flowers or order them from wholesalers, to ensure an adequate supply to meet customers’ needs
  • Determine the type of arrangement desired, the occasion, and the date, time, and location for delivery
  • Recommend flowers and greenery for each arrangement in accordance with the customer’s budget
  • Design floral displays that evoke a particular sentiment or style
  • Answer telephones, take orders, and wrap arrangements

Floral designers may create a single arrangement for a special occasion or design floral displays for rooms and open spaces for large-scale functions, such as weddings, funerals, or banquets. They use their sense of artistry and their knowledge of different types of flowers to choose the appropriate flowers for each occasion. Floral designers may also create single arrangements to serve a customer’s emotional needs, helping the customers to relax. Floral designers need to know what flowers are in season and when they will be available.