Education for the future of your dreams

Education for the future of your dreams

Education is the passport to the future, for tomorrow belongs to those who prepare for it today. - Malcolm X

Education has a very important role in everyone’s life. Perhaps it is one of the most necessary conditions. Of course there are many people who don’t find education to be the only way to insure the future, however in my opinion it is the easiest way to refuse the hard work that will demand physical strength.

During the development of one's consciousness man has always relied on education, learning something new, making discoveries in science.

Secondary Education and why do we need it?

Every person has the right to get an education, without it, one won’t be able even to apply the most basic rules of politeness. Therefore, I think, that secondary education is compulsory for everybody.

Secondary education is the basis of human formation and development process and here the person's consciousness is formed and he begins to set goals and walk on the way to achieve those goals.

Without secondary education, it is hard to imagine someone who will have definite stance to achieve goals.

Goals give birth to aspiration and the aspiration takes us to the searches of different directions. And the main direction is the education.

Any field of education opens doors to that goal to which we were seeking for a long time.

For being active in society, having a higher intellect and for the acquisition of progress in work need to constantly learn.

Higher Education and its benefits

The next step in education is higher education which is the base of the profession that a person chooses depending on his preferences. The right choice of the profession is a very important factor because it’s possible to be successful in everything only if you love the profession you have chosen. If you don’t love your profession you can hardly pass a long and productive route. The time will come when you will start searching something else in order to feel complete. Taking all this into consideration I would like to advise you to think well before you chose your profession.

Imagine yourself working in different areas and so you will be more or less orientated. For example, you may imagine yourself as a doctor: Whether you are able to listen to people's problems and help them and make that your profession? Would you be able to take responsibility for human life? Or maybe a teacher?: transfer your knowledge and experience from generation to generation. Օr why not to try to imagine yourself as a Historian, Stylist, Financier, Psychologist, Architect, Programmer etc. There are professions that are given inherently or you are given any grace from your birth. Having regard to these grants it is necessary to acquire skills due to the diligence, develop that ability and achieve success. In one word professions are numerous but the choice is yours, try to make it right.

The right choice of profession will become your basis for future success. If you have chosen a profession you must take a responsibility and study that certain field with love following current tidings and become a skilful specialist.

You will get a job if you are skilled at your profession and this will let you accomplish your life goals.

Perhaps there will be many people who will say that, however, only with the right profession and job, it isn’t possible to accomplish everything, that we really want. Nevertheless, I always offer to take the questions from the positive side and never seek for unachievable dreams because reasonable steps will lead us to reasonable goals and their implementation. Even if the goals are achievable and can be easily given you must be happy with it and strive to something more. So, in any case, education is the basis to be cautious and go ahead making conclusions from our deeds.

Bucket List 127 offers

In our Bucket List 127 we have put universities that may interest you and maybe you will choose one of them for your further education. Find an appropriate professional field, apply and build your future just as you have dreamed of it.

Here, below I will introduce you some famous universities that can attract your attention.

Graduate from the University of Oxford

The University of Oxford is the oldest university in the English-speaking world and the world’s second oldest surviving university. While its exact founding date is unknown, there is evidence that teaching took place as far back as 1096.

Located in and around Oxford’s medieval city centre, the university comprises 44 colleges and halls, and over 100 libraries, making it the largest library system in the UK.

Students number around 22,000 in total, just over half of whom are undergraduates while over 40 per cent are international, representing 140 countries between them.

Called the 'city of dreaming spires' by Victorian poet, Matthew Arnold, Oxford has the youngest population of any city in England and Wales: nearly a quarter of its residents are university students, which gives Oxford a noticeable buzz.

Oxford has an alumni network of over 250,000 individuals, including more than 120 Olympic medallists, 26 Nobel Prize winners, seven poets laureate, and over 30 modern world leaders (Bill Clinton, Aung San Suu Kyi, Indira Ghandi and 26 UK Prime Ministers, among them).

The university is associated with 11 winners of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry, five in physics and 16 in medicine. Notable Oxford thinkers and scientists include Tim Berners-Lee, Stephen Hawking and Richard Dawkins. The actors Hugh Grant and Rosamund Pike also went to Oxford, as did the writers Oscar Wilde, Graham Greene, Vikram Seth and Philip Pullman.

Oxford’s first international student, named Emo of Friesland, was enrolled in 1190, while the modern day university prides itself on having an ‘international character’ with connections to almost every country in the world and 40% of its faculty drawn from overseas.

As a modern, research-driven university, Oxford has numerous strengths but cites particular prowess in the sciences, having recently ranked number one in the world for medicine (if its Medical Sciences division was a university in its own right, it would be the fourth largest in the UK) and among the top ten universities globally for life sciences, physical sciences, social sciences, and the arts and humanities.

Graduate from the University of Cambridge

Founded in 1209, the University of Cambridge is a collegiate public research institution. Its 800-year history makes it the fourth-oldest surviving university in the world and the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world.

Cambridge serves more than 18,000 students from all cultures and corners of the world. Nearly 4,000 of its students are international and hail from over 120 different countries. In addition, the university’s International Summer Schools offer 150 courses to students from more than 50 countries.

The university is split into 31 autonomous colleges where students receive small group teaching sessions known as college supervisions.

Six schools are spread across the university’s colleges, housing roughly 150 faculties and other institutions. The six schools are: Arts and Humanities, Biological Sciences, Clinical Medicine, Humanities and Social Sciences, Physical Sciences and Technology.

The campus is located in the centre of the city of Cambridge, with its numerous listed buildings and many of the older colleges situated on or near the river Cam.

The university is home to over 100 libraries, which, between them, hold more than 15 million books in total. In the main Cambridge University library alone, which is a legal depository, there are eight million holdings. The university also owns nine arts, scientific and cultural museums that are open to the public throughout the year, as well as a botanical garden.

Cambridge University Press is a non-school institution and operates as the university’s publishing business. With over 50 offices worldwide, its publishing list is made up of 45,000 titles spanning academic research, professional development, research journals, education and bible publishing.

In total, 92 affiliates of the university have been awarded Nobel Prizes, covering every category.

The university’s endowment is valued at nearly £6 billion.

Graduate from London School of Economics and Political Science

The London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) is one of the foremost social science universities in the world, specialising in a wide range of social science disciplines, including economics, politics, sociology, law and anthropology.

It was founded in the late 1800s by Fabian Society members Beatrice and Sidney Webb, Graham Wallas and George Bernard Shaw for the purpose of bettering society, ‘by studying poverty issues and analysing inequalities.’

The philosopher Bertrand Russell taught there in 1895-96 and 1937-38, helping to define the LSE’s ethos. In 1900, it joined the federal University of London and has remained a member ever since, rapidly expanding to its current position near Aldwych in central London, where King George V laid the first stone of its 'Old Building' in 1920.

The LSE boasts associations with 16 Nobel Prize winners and counts 37 past or present world leaders among its alumni. Bertrand Russell received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1950, recognising his writing on ‘humanitarian ideals and freedom of thought’, while Mick Jagger attended as an undergraduate in 1961, dropping out after a year to form the Rolling Stones.

British Prime Minister Clement Attlee was an assistant lecturer there in 1912 and one of the first teachers in the new Department of Social Science and Administration. Lord Beveridge separately was appointed director of the LSE in 1937, later authoring the famous Beveridge Report, a cornerstone of the UK’s welfare state.

The LSE students’ union has twice courted controversy in the past half century, first in a series of riots in 1967 to protest the appointment of director Sir Walter Adams, who had worked as a principal in Zimbabwe under white rule. And again in 1989, when students elected Winston Silcott as their honorary president, after Silcott’s murder conviction (later overturned) during London’s infamous Broadwater Farm riot.

Today, the LSE is world-renowned. Home to 9,600 full time students from some 140 countries, it maintains international partnerships with Columbia University in New York, Sciences Po in Paris, Peking University in Beijing, the National University of Singapore and the University of Cape Town.

Graduate from the Paris-Sorbonne University

Paris-Sorbonne University (also known as Paris IV; French: Université Paris-Sorbonne, Paris IV), is a public research university in Paris, France.

Paris-Sorbonne University is the main inheritor of the old Sorbonne, which dates back to the 13th century. It was one of the first universities in the world.

The largest institution in France dedicated to the study of literature, languages, civilizations, arts, humanities and social sciences is located on the original medieval foundations, and now extends to the Latin Quarter and to other areas in Paris.

The University is characterized by rich culture and tradition with top-quality researchers. Its excellent scientific reputation is demonstrated by regular publications and international exchanges. Paris-Sorbonne seeks to constantly adapt to present-day social and technological changes and to encourage as many students as possible to study at Paris-Sorbonne while preparing for their future careers. The Sorbonne incites its students to think freely, to construct their own judgment so that they can become responsible and inventive citizens who can promote dignity and a culture of peace.

Graduate from the University of Birmingham

Founded in 1900 on the vision set down by politician and statesman Joseph Chamberlain, the University of Birmingham prides itself on a longstanding tradition of innovation and progressive initiatives.

The university was a founding member of the National Union of Students, and the first in the country to be built on a campus model, incorporate a medical school and offer degrees in dentistry.

It was also the country’s first civic or ‘redbrick’ university, with students accepted regardless of their background or religion.

The modern university is home to 26,000 students, 5,000 of them international. With 31% of its academic staff also from overseas, Birmingham lays claim to one of the most diverse campuses in the UK and encourages a global outlook. Students can take advantage of a number of opportunities to internationalise their degree: around 450 undergraduates complete a year abroad as part of their course.

Birmingham’s main campus is located in the Edgbaston area of the city, where it houses the Joseph Chamberlain Memorial Clock Tower (the world’s tallest free-standing clock), and the Barber Institute of Fine Arts, which opened in 1939 and exhibits original work by Van Gogh, Picasso and Monet.

It is also the location of one of the largest medical schools in Europe and the place where pacemakers and plastic heart valves were developed, where allergy vaccines were pioneered and where the first clinical trials of the contraceptive pill outside the USA took place.

Today, the university cites nanotechnology, gene therapy, virtual reality and robotics as being at the forefront of its research priorities.

At various times, it has been home to eight Nobel laureates and its alumni includes the former British prime ministers Stanley Baldwin and Neville Chamberlain.

Despite Birmingham’s industrial roots, the city is one of the greenest in the UK, with more miles of canals than Venice. Popular with foodies, it is second only to London in terms of the number of Michelin star restaurants it boasts and, with almost 40% of its population below the age of 25, the city has one of the youngest populations in Europe.

Graduate from the University College London

University College London (UCL) was founded in 1826 to bring higher education to those who were typically excluded from it. In 1878, it became the first university in England to admit women on equal terms as men.

Located in the heart of London, UCL is a constituent college of the University of London and a member of the Russell Group, with approximately 850 professors and over 6,000 academic and research staff.

UCL comprises 11 faculties: Arts and Humanities, Built Environment, Brain Sciences, Engineering, the Institute of Education, Laws, Life Sciences, Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Medical Sciences, Population Health Sciences, and Social and Historical Sciences.

Throughout its history, UCL has been the birthplace of numerous significant scientific discoveries, with 29 Nobel Prizes awarded to UCL students or staff, including William Ramsay, who won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1904 for his discovery of the noble gases.

In addition, the UCL academic community includes 53 Fellows of the Royal Society, 51 Fellows of the British Academy, 15 Fellows of the Royal Academy of Engineering, and 117 Fellows of the Academy of Medical Sciences.

The student body is nearly 36,000-strong and UCL has one of the largest systems of postgraduate study in the country. Nearly 52 per cent of students are engaged in graduate studies.

Students hail from approximately 150 countries worldwide making up more than one-third of the university’s entire student population.

UCL was the first British university to open a campus in Doha, Qatar, where it runs a centre for the study of cultural heritage. It also has a presence in Adelaide, South Australia, which includes a space science and an energy policy institute.

UCL alumni include film director Derek Jarman, the writer Lynne Truss, Baroness Patricia Scotland, who became the UK’s first female Attorney General, and Marie Stopes, who founded Britain’s first family planning clinic.

The university’s Latin motto translates as ‘Let all come who by merit deserve the most reward.’

Graduate from the Imperial College London

University College London (UCL) was founded in 1826 to bring higher education to those who were typically excluded from it. In 1878, it became the first university in England to admit women on equal terms as men.

Located in the heart of London, UCL is a constituent college of the University of London and a member of the Russell Group, with approximately 850 professors and over 6,000 academic and research staff.

UCL comprises 11 faculties: Arts and Humanities, Built Environment, Brain Sciences, Engineering, the Institute of Education, Laws, Life Sciences, Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Medical Sciences, Population Health Sciences, and Social and Historical Sciences.

Throughout its history, UCL has been the birthplace of numerous significant scientific discoveries, with 29 Nobel Prizes awarded to UCL students or staff, including William Ramsay, who won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1904 for his discovery of the noble gases.

In addition, the UCL academic community includes 53 Fellows of the Royal Society, 51 Fellows of the British Academy, 15 Fellows of the Royal Academy of Engineering, and 117 Fellows of the Academy of Medical Sciences.

The student body is nearly 36,000-strong and UCL has one of the largest systems of postgraduate study in the country. Nearly 52 per cent of students are engaged in graduate studies.

Students hail from approximately 150 countries worldwide making up more than one-third of the university’s entire student population.

UCL was the first British university to open a campus in Doha, Qatar, where it runs a centre for the study of cultural heritage. It also has a presence in Adelaide, South Australia, which includes a space science and an energy policy institute.

UCL alumni include film director Derek Jarman, the writer Lynne Truss, Baroness Patricia Scotland, who became the UK’s first female Attorney General, and Marie Stopes, who founded Britain’s first family planning clinic.

The university’s Latin motto translates as ‘Let all come who by merit deserve the most reward.’

Graduate from the University of Edinburgh

Founded in 1583, the University of Edinburgh (UoE) is the sixth oldest university in the English-speaking world and one of Britain and Ireland’s seven ancient universities.

It is made up of three colleges: Humanities and Social Science, Science and Engineering, and Medicine and Veterinary Medicine. Within these three colleges, there are 20 academic schools.

In total, the university attracts around 35,000 students, the majority of which study within the College of Humanities and Social Science, the largest of its colleges.

Its College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine is reputed to be a world-leader in its field.

UoE is an internationally-focussed university and welcomes students from all corners of the globe, with the majority coming from China and the United States.

Its students can also take advance of the Go Abroad Fund, which provides grants for 250 or students to have a short-term international experience each year. Additionally, students are also encouraged to either study or work abroad as part of their course.

The university receives over £200 million in research income. It spends over £26 million on prizes, scholarships, studentships and bursaries. At around £317 million, it has the third largest endowment of any UK university after Oxford and Cambridge.

A total of 20 Nobel laureates are affiliated with the University of Edinburgh. These include winners of Prizes in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Peace, Literature and the Memorial Prize in Economic Science.

Alumni include Charles Darwin, David Hume, Alexander Graham Bell and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, among many others.

Situated in the heart of the historic capital of Scotland, the city of Edinburgh is home to the Scottish Parliament, an ancient volcanic rock and an iconic castle.

Graduate from the University of Liverpool

The University of Liverpool is a public university and a member of the Russell Group of research-led universities.

Established as University College Liverpool in 1881, it opened its doors to its first set of students in 1882, in what was a disused lunatic asylum.

Its iconic Victoria Building, designed by the English architect Alfred Waterhouse in 1892, is a tourist attraction in its own right. This Grade II listed building, build in the Gothic style, inspired the term ‘redbrick university’, now used to refer to a set of British universities established in leading industrial English cities during the Victorian age.

The university’s motto translates into English as ‘These days of peace foster learning’.

It became an independent university and adopted the name the University of Liverpool, in 1903.

Today, the university is home to around 30,000 students, including 7,000 international students from 127 countries, as well as 195,000 alumni and 6,000 staff.

Among its alumni are the broadcast journalist Jon Snow, and former Poet Laureate Carol Ann Duffy, while nine Nobel Laureates have passed through its doors.

It also claims a presence on every continent, including a Chinese joint venture university in the World Heritage City of Suzhou (Liverpool was the first UK higher education institution to establish an independent university in China), to research stations located in the Arctic.

As well as being the birthplace of the Beatles, the city of Liverpool also boasts the most number of museums and galleries in the UK outside of London, and was designated the European Capital of Culture in 2008.

According to Rough Guides, the travel guides series, Liverpool is the fourth friendliest city in the world.

Graduate from the Florida State University

Florida State University is a public institution that was founded in 1851. It has a total undergraduate enrollment of 32,706, its setting is city, and the campus size is 476 acres. It utilizes a semester-based academic calendar. Florida State University's ranking in the 2017 edition of Best Colleges is National Universities, 92. Its in-state tuition and fees are $6,507 (2016-17); out-of-state tuition and fees are $21,673 (2016-17).

Florida State University is a sprawling public school in Tallahassee, the state’s capital. Freshmen are not required to live on campus, and typically, there is not room for every student, so it’s important to apply early if you’d like to live in university housing. There are more than 600 student organizations to check out, as well as adventure trips for kayaking, backpacking, whitewater rafting and more coordinated through the school’s Outdoor Pursuits program. The Florida State Seminoles sports teams compete in the NCAA Division I Atlantic Coast Conference and are traditionally dominant contenders in baseball and football.

For students interested in studying abroad, Florida State has centers in Florence, Italy; London; Panama City, Panama; and Valencia, Spain, and offers students other study abroad programs as well. Florida State has a wide variety of graduate schools, including a College of Business, a College of Law and a College of Medicine. The university also has a joint College of Engineering with Florida A&M University. Among the notable graduates of Florida State University are fitness expert Richard Simmons and Spa

I hope with this blog we could help you with your professional orientation.

Be purposeful and never give up no way whatever happens, because difficulties and trials are meant to make us stronger.